MRI-guided focused ultrasound gene delivery from the blood to the brain. (Thévenot et al, 2012)
MRI-guided focused ultrasound gene delivery from the blood to the brain.
Courtesy of I. Aubert

Brain/Neuroscience

Brain & Neuroscience researchers study neuropyschology, neuroimmunology, neurogenetics, proteomics and neurological disease mechanisms. The goal of these investigations, and the study of their respective pathobiological networks, is to better understand and treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, brain cancer and, in general, all diseases related to the brain and nervous system.

Our broad spectrum of research includes:

  • the role of ion channels
  • receptors and signal transduction
  • synapse formation and plasticity
  • neural cell fate
  • neuronal guidance
  • neuronal networks

Faculty Involved in Brain & Neuroscience Research

Lecturer

As a devoted electron microscopist, I am interested in the utilization of advanced EM methodologies in the study of disease. These include analytical energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, cryomicroscopy, immunogold labelling, morphometry and electron tomography. As a consequence I have been able to identify changes in diseases I have been studying that might not have been detected using conventional approaches.

Professor

The Brain Repair Group, led by Dr. Isabelle Aubert, focuses on developing therapies to stop neurodegeneration and promote regeneration under pathological conditions found in cases of Alzheimer's disease.

Joan Boggs
Professor Emeritus / Emerita

My research program is aimed at understanding myelinogenesis by oligodendrocytes. We are currently focusing on the structure and roles of myelin basic protein in interactions with the cytoskeleton and SH3-domain proteins and the role of glycosphingolipids in cell-surface phenomena. We are also studying the effect of estrogens on oligodendrocytes and myelin.

Shelley Boyd
Assistant Professor

Our team focuses on the mechanisms and potential treatments of blinding eye disease.  We take a fully integrated translational approach that includes pre-clinical models of disease, biomarker development, and early and late phase clinical trial. 

Assistant Professor

My research focuses on two areas: (1) clinical utility of biomarkers (proteins & DNA) in lymphoproliferative and cerebrovascular diseases, and (2) practice-based research;

Associate Professor

My research program focuses on discovering and elucidating the molecular signaling pathways involved in the development of the mammalian inner ear. The goal of the laboratory is to connect developmental biology to inner ear diseases and ultimately to regenerative medicine for the amelioration of hearing and balance disorders.

Associate Professor

Our lab is interested in the mechanisms that underlie the stem cell identity and direct cell fate in the normal brain and in glioblastoma.       

Assistant Professor

The Diamandis Lab II leverages artificial intelligence and mass spectrometry to define global morphometric and proteomic patterns defining normal development, health maintenance and disease. They use machine learning approaches to interrogate generated datasets and resolve inter- and intra-patient molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity. These discovery tools guide more focused validation studies into mechanisms driving neurological disorders.

Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor

Retinal disease, glaucoma, degeneration of vision pathways, neuroprotection and pharmacological treatment strategies, intraocular pressure regulation, the role of the lymphatic circulation in the eye, neuroimaging and clinical trials, public health

Professor

Dr. Halliday is a clinically oriented Neuropathologist with a longstanding interest in correlative studies, particularly clinical-pathological and radiological-pathological correlations. Expertise with morphological investigations is shared with collaborative research studies, especially in the area of oncology (retinoblastoma). Central nervous system traumatic injury, particularly as it relates to infants, is an ongoing interest.

Associate Professor

Molecular mechanisms underlying long term effects of brain trauma, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Seizure disorder.

Professor
Lecturer

My areas of research include development of experimental models in forensic pathology and public health.    

Assistant Professor

My research aims to understand the key molecular pathways responsible for neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and to develop novel therapies by targetting these pathways.

Assistant Professor

My laboratory focuses on understanding how chaperone molecules fail to maintain protein homeostasis in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders with the goal of developing novel molecular therapeutics for the treatment of these disorders.

Associate Professor

My academic interests include education, neuromuscular and neurodegenerative neuropathology.

Professor Emeritus / Emerita

Study of pituitary tumours using histology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and, in collaboration, applying molecular/genetic methods. Tumour morphology is correlated with clinical findings, endocrinologic and imaging parameters. Investigations include: biomarkers, angiogenesis, biologic behaviour, prediction of prognosis and assessment of therapeutic responsiveness.

Professor

Characterization of novel combination therapeutics to fully recover functioning in Alzheimer’s disease. This work is based on the premise that strategies in clinical trials will have benefit in stabilizing disease progression; to achieve optimal cognitive functioning therapies that address other targets will also be necessary. A focus of these new strategies is to understand the contribution of comorbid diseases to onset and progression of AD.

Professor

His  research interest is focused on neuropathology, particularly the mechanisms of development and progression of degenerative diseases of the brain, including Alzheimer's disease, the non-Alzheimer dementias, movement disorders, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.He also publishes regularly on neuro-oncology and diagnostic aspects of general neuropathology.

Professor

                                                   

Professor

The focus of our research is to study the cause(s) and cure(s ) of  Amyotrophic Lateral Scelrosis.

Professor

My lab studies the molecular biology of human brain tumours.  We have developed model systems to analyze the manner in which brain tumours grow, invade, and evade therapy. Our goal is to increase our understanding of brain tumour biology so that new treatments can be discovered in the lab.

Associate Professor

We study Alzheimer’s disease and prion disorders, pursuing the hypothesis that early diagnostics and disease intervention strategies will emerge from an in-depth understanding of etiologies. To this end, we focus on (1) molecular events that promote the formation of toxic Aβ assemblies, (2) how the presence of Aβ causes perturbations in the biology of Tau, and (3) how disease-associated conformers of Tau or PrP cause cells to die.

Professor

The focus of Dr. Schuurmans’ research is on the specification of neural cell fates in the developing central nervous system, in particular in the developing retina and neocortex. She is now applying her knowledge of neural development to understand the injury response, and to mobilize endogenous stem cells for tissue repair. Her lab is also developing lineage conversion strategies for neural cell replacement therapies.

Associate Professor
Professor Emeritus / Emerita

Dr Shek's research addresses severe hemorrhage associated with coagulopathy that requires immediate blood loss control and fluid resuscitation. His other research area explores the application of magnetoencephalography for the objective diagnosis and assessment of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury.

Associate Professor

Our laboratory is investigating the molecular pathways directing tissue injury and repair responses in the eye and brain.

Assistant Professor

Research is focused on the identification and characterization of genetic conditions in psychiatric patients, particularly those with dual diagnosis (psychiatric disorder + intellectual disability).  In collaboration with psychiatrists, the goal is to develop protocols and tools for psychiatrists and primary care physicians to optimize the diagnosis, management and treatment of psychiatric patients with underlying genetic disorders.

Assistant Professor

We use advanced genomic technologies to identify novel genetic variants responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders, with the ultimate goal of understanding the downstream biological pathways.

Professor

We use functional genomic and epigenomic tools to investigate how normal cells are turned into brain tumours. In addition, we use the genomic analyses results to create new animal models of medulloblastoma and ependymoma so that novel targeted therapies can be developed. This multi-layered approach allows for rapid clinically-important changes to brain tumour therapy, such that the quality of life of patients can be drastically improved.

Associate Professor
Professor

The Wallace lab is working on the regulation of neurogenesis and neural progenitor transformation in the vertebrate CNS and regenrative medicine approaches to retina repair. 

Professor
Assistant Professor

Current research interest in genetics and pharmacogenetics of neuropsychiatric disorders and suicidal behaviour. Secondary interests include rodent behavioural models and whole-genome study methods.